Chinese invasion is real

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By Rose de la Cruz

 

It’s not a question of the number of Chinese fishing vessels, manned by maritime militia (civilians armed and taking orders from the regular military commands of China) encircling or operating in the small island of Pag-Asa.

 

The implication of their steady presence clearly indicates an impending invasion as they are not here to fish but to keep watch and protect it from Filipinos, whose nation was deemed the legitimate owner of the island under the 200- mile economic zone of the United Nations. They are militias because they don’t wear uniforms but get orders/commands from the Chinese military structure.

 

Whether the bows sighted by the Western Command in recent months number 617 or 275 from January 1 to March 24, 2019, the fact remains that they linger there for good to show their actual (physical) possession of the waters. They also harass and shoo away Filipino fishermen claiming they have no rights to fish in Chinese waters.

 

Clearly, China is preparing for an outright takeover of the waters, and eventually the entire land area of the Philippines and make it a part of its province. Why not, the Philippines is rich not just in natural resources (mines, fish, and fertile agricultural lands but also human talents) which China badly needs for its subsistence and sustainability.

 

This must be alarming enough for higher ups in the Philippine police and military forces as their presence in our waters, augmented by the millions in land-based jobs in the country, is powerful enough to overcome a politically divided country like ours.

 

The ABS-CBN said that China has been deploying maritime militias in Philippine territorial waters for the past several years to poach or fish in rich Philippine waters to feed its starving and insatiable people—regardless if Filipinos themselves have nothing to eat but the imported (plastic?) rice and sodium-laden meat loafs from China.

 

This week, thousands of American and Filipino troops are holding the annual joint exercises in various provinces of Luzon, which China would not agree to and easily interpret the exercises as a military offensive against them. By God’s grace, I hope that no armed clashes would result from this annual weeklong military exercise.

 

Prof. Jay Batungbacal, director for the Institute for Maritime Affairs, who led the team that scored the success for the Philippines over the West Philippine Sea and the Benham Rise and Benham Bank, said 275 supposedly fishing vessels “is an alarming number for that very small area.”

 

Batungbacal said they are all part of the Chinese military command—the militias, the Chinese Coast Guard, and the Chinese navy are all taking orders from the formal military command.

 

The Chinese boats with militias now navigate their way to disputed waters in Asia knowing that other claimants will not fire at vessels that look civilian and manned by non-uniformed Chinese, the ABS-CBN reported.

 

Presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo said that last Monday, the Philippines filed a note verbale against China— weeks after former Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario and former Ombudsman Conchita Carpio Morales submitted a communication to International Criminal Court prosecutor Fatou Bensouda on behalf of Filipino fishermen "persecuted and injured" by Chinese officials.

 

The note verbale “though a bit too late is a welcome first step,” said del Rosario adding that “better late than never.”

 

The Chinese ambassador went to Panelo recently but did not confirm whether the vessels were manned by militias or not. Panelo said if those boats are manned by militia they should be sent away but if they are fishermen they could stay.

 

This move allows Chinese fishermen (in high-powered boats) continued access to the fishing grounds of the Philippines and virtually empowers them to drive away the small Filipino fishermen since they come in big numbers.

 

The complaint was filed against Chinese President Xi Jinping for “Beijing’s massive island-building activities in the South China Sea” on March 21, just after Manila official withdrew from ICC.